Rockwell hardness test

Rockwell hardness test is a technique that is used to measure the hardness of the materials. Rockwell hardness scale is usually administered to distinguish the hardness of the metals, like cemented carbides, thin steel, lead, copper alloys, zinc aluminium, iron, and titanium. However, the scale is as well used to test particular plastics. The hardness of the metal, as measured by the Rockwell scale, is the resistance to the penetration. The test got this name from a person known as Stanley P. Rockwell, who developed the test and the original machines and afterward sold the rights to them. This test was administered first in 1919.

Rockwell hardness test

How the Test Works Rockwell hardness test typically measures the hardness of the metal in the simplest method possible: by pressing the indenter in the material surface with a particular load and after that measuring the far that the indenter can be capable of penetrating. In the majority of the cases, the indenter is made of either a diamond or a steel ball. However, the certainty is much more complicated, since the metal samples differ completely. As a result, a similar approach cannot be employed for all the samples. Actually, there are thirty diverse Rockwell scales, and each of the scales typically uses a diverse mixture of test forces as well as types of indenters. Therefore, when looking for a suitable scale, most evaluators usually consider the shape and the size of the test material, and its homogeneity, in addition to the limitations of every scale.